Facts About Blue Jays

Blue Jays are among some of North America’s most famous backyard birds. If you’re an experienced birdwatcher or simply interested in the beautiful songbirds that are often seen within your yard, you’ll find this article fascinating and instructive. Continue reading to discover 22 fascinating Facts About Blue Jays!

22 FUN FACTS ABOUT BLUE JAYS

Here are some amazing Blue Jays facts that feel so adorable. Have a look!

ONE OF BLUE JAYS’ FAVORITE FOODS IS ACORNS.

Blue Jays typically live on the edges of forests, and they adore acorns and other nuts and seeds. They live near oak trees often because of their love for eating Acorns.

Also, read Amazing Facts About Hummingbirds And Their Species!

BLUE JAYS AREN’T BLUE.

Blue Jays are identifiable by their head crests and their blue, white, and black feathers. The dark color of the feathers of Blue Jays is melanin. A trick of light results in the blue color of the feathers. The scattering of light through altered cells on the surface of their feather barbs creates their feathers to appear to be blue.

BLUE JAYS ARE OMNIVORES.

Although Blue Jays eat mostly seeds, fruits, nuts, and berries, they do take pleasure in eating insects. 

Also, read 10+ Exciting Facts About Birds!!

FEMALE AND MALE BLUE JAYS LOOK THE SAME.

It is a unique characteristic in birds and is known as sexual monomorphism, which means that males and females appear alike. Certain species of birds also have females and males that have very distinct looks, which is known as sexual dimorphism. Females and males Blue Jays have similar plumage. It is difficult to distinguish them. But the male Blue Jays are slightly larger.

BLUE JAYS LIVE A LONG TIME.

On average, Blue Jay lives about five to seven years. However, the longest-lived Blue Jay lived for a minimum of 26 years and 11 months.

THE BLUE JAY IS NOT A STATE BIRD.

Seven US states have claimed that the Northern Cardinal as their state bird. However, Blue Jay isn’t one of them. Blue Jay is not recognized as a bird of state for the state of any US state. But, they are the emblem of the Major League Baseball Team, the Toronto Blue Jays.

BLUE JAYS ACT AS A NATURAL ALARM SYSTEM FOR OTHER BIRDS.

Like other small birds, one of the predators of the Blue Jay is the Red-shouldered Hawk. They alert other birds to the hawk’s presence by mimicking the hawk’s sound whenever they spot one.

Also, read Ladybug Facts

BLUE JAYS MAKE A LOT OF SOUNDS.

Intelligent birds love to chat often. They can mimic the sounds of predators, and their calls vary from sweet chirps in the morning to loud and loud chatter. The term jay was used to describe a person with a personality that was a chatterbox who preferred to dominate conversations. Therefore, Blue Jays live up to their name.

BLUE JAYS FLY SLOWLY.

Compared with other species, Blue Jays fly quite slowly, at around 20-25 miles per hour. Ducks fly up to sixty miles per hour. So when compared to Blue Jays, Blue Jays’ flight is slow.

BLUE JAYS ARE VERY INTELLIGENT.

In the wild, Blue Jays have been observed to use tools to obtain food, including making use of newspaper scraps or sticks to get foods closer to the outside of their cages. They are also seen manipulating locks. Farmers have also seen Blue Jays waiting until they’re finished planting before they fly off and have a taste of the seeds.

BLUE JAYS MATE FOR LIFE.

The mating season usually occurs from mid-March until July. After the female Blue Jay chooses her mate, the pair will typically be married in a unisexual relationship for the rest of their lives.

BLUE JAYS HAVE INTERESTING SOCIAL BONDS.

Females and males Blue Jays work together to construct the nest for their babies, and when the female is in the egg, male Blue Jays will feed her and take care of her. After the youngsters are 17-21 days old, the entire family will leave their nest.

BLUE JAYS HAVE MYSTERIOUS MIGRATION PATTERNS.

Certain Blue Jays stay all year in one spot while others move. The younger Blue Jays are much more inclined to move than older ones. Certain individuals Blue Jays will migrate south in one winter but not move the following winter.

BLUE JAYS ARE DIURNAL.

Certain birds are nocturnal and active at night. However, Blue Jays are active during the day, meaning they’re diurnal.

BLUE JAYS HAVE MANY PREDATORS.

Adult Blue Jays are preyed on by Owls, cats, and hawks. But young Blue Jays are preyed on by raccoons and snakes. Opossums, crows, and squirrels.

BLUE JAYS HAVE STRONG BILLS.

Blue Jays, like other birds, use their powerful bills to break seeds as well as nuts and acorns to eat.

BLUE JAYS PREFER NESTING IN EVERGREEN TREES.

Any tree or shrub can be used to nest; however, the Blue Jays seem to largely prefer evergreen trees. They construct their nests approximately 3 to 10 meters tall within the tree. The nests are cup-shaped and comprised of twigs, bark, moss, cloth paper, feathers, and paper.

BLUE JAYS ARE IN THE SAME FAMILY AS THE CROW.

Although they’re prettier, Blue Jays are close to the Crow.

BLUE JAYS ARE EXPANDING WHERE THEY LIVE.

They are found mostly in the central and eastern regions of the United States, but they are expanding slowly into the Northwest.

BLUE JAYS PARTICIPATE IN A PRACTICE KNOWN AS “ANTING.”

Blue Jays will take ants and spread them over their feathers. This appears as if they’re bathing in the ants. However, scientists believe they do this to cause the ants to secrete their poisonous spray to ensure that the ants will be more easily digestible when Blue Jays eat them.

BLUE JAYS USUALLY LIVE IN SMALL FAMILIES.

Blue Jays reside in small families or pairs. However, they can be found in large groups during their mysterious migratory seasons.

FOR A SMALL BIRD, BLUE JAYS HAVE A LARGE WINGSPAN.

The wingspan of the Blue Jay could vary from 13 up to 17 inches.

About Chris

Chris Evan was born in Quebec and raised in Montreal, except for the time when he moved back to Quebec and attended high school there. He studied History and Literature at the University of Toronto. He began writing after obsessing over books.

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