15 Fun Facts About Georgia

Was Vance Joy talking about a person when he sang that he had Georgia on his mind in the 2014 single “Georgia”? Perhaps it was about Georgia. Explore amazing Facts About Georgia below!

Although it might not be the most visited country in Europe, we can see why you would love to visit this amazing country. Let’s take a look at some interesting facts about Georgia that make it so special.

Facts About Georgia

1. It is the birthplace of wine!

It is difficult to imagine a world with wine, especially now! We have Georgia to thank! This wonderful beverage has been perfected for over 8,000 years. Their winemaking technique, which uses a clay jar called a Qvevri, has been included on the UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity List.

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2. Georgia was the home of the first Europeans

An archaeological expedition to Dmanisi found the oldest Caucasus human skulls, which belonged to Zezva and Mzia (1.8 million years old). They are considered an important link between African ancestors and Europeans.

3. Georgians love hosting guests!

Georgians believe that guests are a gift from God. A’supra’ is a traditional Georgian feast where guests are welcomed with open arms. The ‘made (a toastmaster) will ensure that you are fed and entertained. Make sure to raise a glass, and say “Gaumarjos,” which in Georgian means “cheers.”

4. There are 12 climate zones.

Georgia has climates that range from subtropical to semi-desert and alpine.

5. Georgia is home to the world’s deepest cave.

The Veryovkina Cave is a hidden gem in the Gagra Mountain range of the western Caucasus. This cave is 2,212 meters deep and is the longest cave on Earth!

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6. The Caucasus is Europe’s highest mountain range.

Many people assume the Alps are Europe’s highest mountain range, but this is not true. The Caucasus Mountains, which run along the border of Georgia and Russia, are higher. Although Russia is home to the highest peak, Georgia’s highest mountain, Shkhara, which is 5,193m tall, is about 400m higher than France’s Mont Blanc.

7. Here you can live in the highest settlement in Europe.

The ancient villages of Ushguli, located in the mountainous region Svaneti, are at an astounding 2,100m above sea level. It is easy to see why they settled here, with the stunning scenery!

8. The name of the capital Tbilisi is derived from the Georgian word “warm.”

Although the climate in Tbilisi can be subtropical, it can still be quite cold in winter. This is not why it has this warm nickname. This is due to the natural hot springs discovered in the 5th Century.

9. It is home to three UNESCO World Heritage-listed Sites.

The Gelati Monastery, an impressive cathedral complex, was the former capital of Mtskheta. Also, the region in the mountains of Upper Svaneti made it onto the list. There are many others on the tentative list.

10. It speaks a unique language

Georgian has its own alphabet because of the unique influence of Greek and Iranian languages. The language has been through three iterations throughout its history. However, the current version is composed of 33 letters.

11. Georgia’s Jewish community is among the oldest in the country.

The country is divided into two groups: Georgian Jews, who have been living in Georgia for around 2,600 years; Ashkenazi Jews arrived in the 19th Century.

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12. It is well-known for its polyphonic musical compositions.

Polyphonic music can be described as choral folk music that two or more people sing. It predates the introduction of Christianity to Georgia in the early 4th Century.

13. Georgia was the birthplace of Joseph Stalin.

In 1878, he was born in Gori, which was then part of the Russian Empire. A museum in Gori is now dedicated to Stalin, which glorifies his life. ).

14. Georgians use a different name to refer to their country.

Locals call it Sakartvelo, while Kartveli call themselves Kartveli. This most likely derives from Kartli, a central Georgian region. It is still a matter of debate where Georgia got its name. Is it St George, the country’s patron saint, or Georgi, the Greek name of agricultural tribes? Or the Persian-Arabic Gurg, which means land of wolves? We might never know the truth!

15. Georgia is very safe to visit.

It was ranked 7th in terms of safety in 2017 but be careful not to go to certain areas near the Russian border.

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